Articles Posted in Internal Medicine

Lonnie Kersey had a family history of prostate cancer. He took Avodart to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia. His treating internist, Dr. Michael Pisano, allegedly ordered lab work in 2012 and 2014, including a prostate-specific antigen test (PSA).

The following year, Dr. Pisano allegedly ordered another PSA, which showed a value of 3.0 ng/mL, nearly triple the previous results.

Dr. Pisano ordered further testing two years later, at which point Kersey’s PSA was significantly elevated at 203.3 ng/mL. This led to a biopsy and diagnosis of Stage IV prostate cancer.
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Doe, age 63, went to Dr. Roe, his primary care physician, for a physical examination. Dr. Roe ordered a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test, which showed an abnormal result of 17.6 ng/mL.

The results prompted Dr. Roe to repeat the test that day, the second test, which resulted in a higher reading of 18.46 ng/mL.

Dr. Roe allegedly attributed the abnormal PSA values to Mr. Doe’s having to hold his urine for long periods of time while he was at work. At a follow-up appointment six months later, Dr. Roe ordered another PSA test; it showed a result of 43.15 ng/mL.
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A Texas Appellate Court has held that a hospital internist was not liable for medical negligence. The case arises out of his choosing not to timely diagnose a post-surgical patient’s condition and then consult with the patient’s treating neurosurgeon.

Charles Collins underwent neck surgery performed by neurosurgeon Dr. Shanker Sundraini. The afternoon of the surgery, Collins developed worrisome symptoms, including numbness and weakness in his extremities.

Hospital staff called Dr. Sundraini; nurses noted the following morning that Collins had movement in his extremities but could not grip.
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